Backyard Japanese Garden

If done well, a Japanese garden will have beauty, and reflect a balance often found in nature. These are not like English gardens or Italian gardens. There typically is not a lot of color or plant variety. Rather, the sense of serenity you get when in a Japanese garden offers an opportunity for quiet contemplation and meditation. The 4 basic components of a Japanese garden are rocks, water, a bridge (typical, but not mandatory), and shrubbery (plus other foliage) which reflect the traditional Japanese concepts.

Depending on where you live, folks (your local suppliers, landscape designers, and other pros) can advise you about local plants that will work in Japanese gardens. I also suggest using landscape design software (usually available through a supplier) to see how your garden will look BEFORE you buy anything. This is a great planning tool.

There’s a lot of work and expense involved in the initial construction of these gardens, but once done, the upkeep is minimal. One important rule of thumb is to keep the water circulating. To have standing water anywhere near your house is a bad idea. It will breed mosquitoes. Use a lot of mulch around the shrubs to give the garden a clean, well maintained look. You’ll probably get a few weeds, but much less than if you didn’t use the mulch.

I believe a Japanese garden is a great thing for retired people because it offers opportunities for several hobbies. You can get into bonsai plants; you can raise Koi fish; you can grow orchids; or you could simply sit and enjoy the peace and tranquility that backyard Japanese gardens can provide.

If you’re seriously considering doing this, I recommend you visit http://www.a-Japanese-garden.com. They know this subject frontwards & backwards, and will assist with information about plants, designs, rocks and stones. They even offer a line of make-believe rocks that actually look like the real thing.

While creating any backyard project, take your time and let it be fun. Don’t put pressure on yourself to finish. The process should be as enjoyable as admiring the result. Best of Luck.

Charles Gueli invites you to ask questions about Japanese gardens and take advantage of the resources on [http://www.continuous-home-improvement-help.com], where guidance, information and support are always available – helping homeowners make better decisions.

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Small Backyard Garden Ideas

The right small backyard landscaping ideas can help you squeeze a lot of use out of a little land. Those expansive, perfectly manicured, fancifully landscaped backyards you see in gardening magazines may be beautiful, but most of us don’t have acres of land to use as our canvas. If you’re like most folks in urban areas, you’re probably working with just 100 square feet or even less. That small size may rule out hedge mazes and topiary menageries, but it still leaves you with plenty of room for creativity.

Going Up! 
If your small backyard doesn’t provide the space to expand outward, try expanding upward. Vertical landscaping lets you make use of your yard’s vertical space, giving you a way to fit in your favorite flowers, ornamentals and even vegetables. Placing your plants on the vertical plane is also handy if you dislike bending or kneeling to tend low-growing plants.

Tiered potted plant stands and hangers make it easy to get started gardening upward. For more vertical options, try installing a trellis against a sunny wall, an arch or arbor over your entryway, or a pergola over your seating area. A bench with a trellis on each side or arch arcing over the seat does double duty to provide a rest stop and space for more plants. These benches works especially well for aromatic plants, bringing the plant close to nose level, where it’s easier to enjoy.

Backyard Multitasking 
One of the problems with a small backyard is that you can see the whole thing at a glance and then the experience is over, leaving you thinking “Is that all?” A solution is to divide the area into distinct outdoor rooms. This not only multiplies the uses you can get out of the area, it also breaks up the view and gives you the feeling of having more places in the yard to go and explore.

Use trellises or plant screens to section off one part of the yard from the rest, then design each section for a particular use. In one “room” you might create a partially paved dining area with a table and chairs, pots of aromatic herbs and efficient outdoor lighting for evening meals, while another other room might serve as a reading nook with a chaise lounge or hammock, rustling bamboo and small waterfall to create a relaxing ambiance.

Michael Aral invites you to get more detailed tips onĀ small backyard landscapingĀ at Backyard-Landscaping-Ideas.com. Learn how to create a beautiful landscaping design in a small space, get ideas for plants that don’t need lots of room, and discover where to get plenty of landscaping pictures and photos.

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