Backyard Tilapia Farming

Fish farming has become an alternative solution to the rising market demand for fresh fish. It can also be a profitable business for homeowners and can give additional income to your family if you learn how to start, operate and grow your own fish farm at home.

If you want to venture into home fish farming, you have to start by having a viable business plan. In the planning process, you have to take into account the economic, financial, and legal aspects of starting the business. You can start your home fish farming venture with a backyard pond. A good farm pond is one that is connected to any source of free-flowing water like lake or river. In home fish farming, fishes can also be raised in fish tanks and can be put indoors or outdoors.

Another important factor to consider in starting a home fish farming business is your budget. If you don’t have enough personal money for it, you may try availing financial support from government agencies. You should also plan how to market your fishes after growing them. You can sell them to restaurants or supermarkets or breed them. Experts say that you can get more profits if you hatch your own fish instead of paying a hatchery to supply you with young fish.

Aside from the moneymaking benefit of your home fish farm, it can also be a good source of fresh fish for your personal consumption. If you aren’t sure of making it a sole business, you can consider it as a hobby type part-time business instead.

The most popular fish that you can use in home fish farming is tilapia. However, you may also consider other species like carp, catfish or milkfish. Your decision on what type of fish to raise in your home fish farm should depend on the water quality, temperature and salt content of your farm.

In tilapia farming, your grow-out strategy should focus on controlling water quality in the farm and the food supply of your fish. To maintain the right environmental conditions in the pond culture for tilapia, you have to balance the inputs of feed with the pond’s assimilative capacity. The algae, bacteria and zooplankton in the pond will convert the waste through the natural biological processes.

The additional benefit offered by home fish farming to low-income farmers is the ability to invest in fish cultivation to give them additional income and food source.

For those with limited commercial inputs and resources needed for intensive fish production methods, you can try an alternative approach that is guaranteed to be low-cost. This is by relying on household waste supplemented with protein from snails and other homemade supplements to serve as food for the fish.

To ensure the success and profitability of your fish farm, you have to consider how to manage the potential problems that may arise to prevent them before they pose damage to your business like irregular supply of water, building up of organic matter, leakage or breakage in the pond wall, the predators, and fish diseases.

Carolyn Anderson is an advocate of organic gardening. For new techniques of organic gardening at home, check out this Ultimate Aquaponics Home System. Also check out The Cinder Block Gardening, where you can find great techniques that the busiest professionals can use to enjoy their free time in home gardening.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/3457544

Backyard Fish Farming

Fish farming, also called aquaculture, is one of the fastest growing areas of agriculture in the world. Most farmed fish comes from Asia, and more consumers are worried about the quality and potential hazards from imported farm raised fish. With this, and a growing demand for farm raised fish, there are more opportunities for domestic fish farming.

A major advantage to fish farming is how easy fish are to raise, compared to other animals. Even children commonly raise fish at home in a bowl or aquarium. Many people are discovering that fish farming is not much more difficult than simply scaling up what is done with a common home aquarium.

As a source of meat, fish are known for their health benefits, and they can also be easier to raise than other animals for meat. This is especially true for small scale farmers and back yard growers. Having a heard of cows or pigs in a city yard is just not practical, and in most cases not allowed. But fish are easy to get along with, take up little space, they are low key, and can be very efficient at turning feed into usable protein.

For backyard farmers, small scale fish farming can be a great hobby or even a business. Fish are great in urban areas, since they don’t make noise and won’t break down the fence and get into the neighbors yard. They also can be grown without a need for fertile soil or sunlight. And a commonly overlooked benefit to fish farming is the wastes the fish produce.

Fish wastes are commonly thought of as being one of the downsides of fish farming. For large commercial operations especially, filtering the water and disposing of the fish wastes can be a big expense. There is also concern about disposing of the water into waterways and causing pollution. But that is only because so many aquaculturists have not yet discovered the value of the fish water and the wastes in it.

Fish release chemicals and effluent into the water that can become toxic to them if it builds up. This is why aquaculture produces so much waste water, to carry the wastes away. The stuff in the water that is not so good for the fish, is great for plants. Fish water is high in the nutrients that plants love. Fish farmers have the privilege to have large supplies of water that is full of organic nutrients that can do an amazing job of growing plants. Unfortunately many of them let it go to waste.

A common way for a small scale home fish farmer to use this fish water is for watering the yard and garden. But a more efficient way to utilize it, is a fast growing form of agriculture called aquaponics. With aquaponics, the water from the fish tank is fed directly to the plants in a hydroponics system. With this system, plants are not grown in soil, but are instead grown directly in the fish water that is fed to them in a grown bed. This gives the plants a constant supply of water and organic nutrients. And the beauty of this system is, the plants, along with friendly bacteria in the system, clean the water so it can be circulated back to the fish tank instead of being wasted. Aquaponics is a very efficient way to grow both fish and organic vegetables, while consuming very little water, and without the need for mechanical filters or adding fertilizer.

Learn more about aquaponics with this aquaponics how to [http://tilapiafarming.org/aquaponics-how-to-guide/] guide. Learn how aquaponics can take a lot of the work and expense out of small scale fish farming, and make it more productive.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5946768

Backyard Fish Farming

Fish farming, also called aquaculture, is one of the fastest growing areas of agriculture in the world. Most farmed fish comes from Asia, and more consumers are worried about the quality and potential hazards from imported farm raised fish. With this, and a growing demand for farm raised fish, there are more opportunities for domestic fish farming.

A major advantage to fish farming is how easy fish are to raise, compared to other animals. Even children commonly raise fish at home in a bowl or aquarium. Many people are discovering that fish farming is not much more difficult than simply scaling up what is done with a common home aquarium.

As a source of meat, fish are known for their health benefits, and they can also be easier to raise than other animals for meat. This is especially true for small scale farmers and back yard growers. Having a heard of cows or pigs in a city yard is just not practical, and in most cases not allowed. But fish are easy to get along with, take up little space, they are low key, and can be very efficient at turning feed into usable protein.

For backyard farmers, small scale fish farming can be a great hobby or even a business. Fish are great in urban areas, since they don’t make noise and won’t break down the fence and get into the neighbors yard. They also can be grown without a need for fertile soil or sunlight. And a commonly overlooked benefit to fish farming is the wastes the fish produce.

Fish wastes are commonly thought of as being one of the downsides of fish farming. For large commercial operations especially, filtering the water and disposing of the fish wastes can be a big expense. There is also concern about disposing of the water into waterways and causing pollution. But that is only because so many aquaculturists have not yet discovered the value of the fish water and the wastes in it.

Fish release chemicals and effluent into the water that can become toxic to them if it builds up. This is why aquaculture produces so much waste water, to carry the wastes away. The stuff in the water that is not so good for the fish, is great for plants. Fish water is high in the nutrients that plants love. Fish farmers have the privilege to have large supplies of water that is full of organic nutrients that can do an amazing job of growing plants. Unfortunately many of them let it go to waste.

A common way for a small scale home fish farmer to use this fish water is for watering the yard and garden. But a more efficient way to utilize it, is a fast growing form of agriculture called aquaponics. With aquaponics, the water from the fish tank is fed directly to the plants in a hydroponics system. With this system, plants are not grown in soil, but are instead grown directly in the fish water that is fed to them in a grown bed. This gives the plants a constant supply of water and organic nutrients. And the beauty of this system is, the plants, along with friendly bacteria in the system, clean the water so it can be circulated back to the fish tank instead of being wasted. Aquaponics is a very efficient way to grow both fish and organic vegetables, while consuming very little water, and without the need for mechanical filters or adding fertilizer.

Learn more about aquaponics with this aquaponics how to [http://tilapiafarming.org/aquaponics-how-to-guide/] guide. Learn how aquaponics can take a lot of the work and expense out of small scale fish farming, and make it more productive.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5946768